Category Archives: vegetarian appetizers

Appetizers II

I am quickly going to get out the promised appetizers here for the holiday season, although they can be useful at any time. All of these are gluten-free,low-carb and all are vegetarian; they can be made dairy-free and vegan.

A selection of appetizers

A selection of appetizers

The selection pictured above go from a little preparation to pull-‘em-out-of-a-jar. I simply stuck toothpicks in jarred pimento-stuffed green olives and those are fine for an addition to a plate, but please, don’t just serve those!
The tomatoes I prepped with a melon baller:

A handy tool:the melon baller

A handy tool:the melon baller

(A famous TV chef recently described this item as a “mini ice cream scoop”!)

The tool is used to ‘ball’ melons, but they also make a useful tool to hollow-out grape and cherry tomatoes.

The grape tomatoes above to the right in the picture are miniature versions of my Italian Baked Tomatoes [ October 15, 2012 archive], served on fresh spinach leaves.

The cherry tomatoes in the middle and the black olives to the lower right in the photo are stuffed with herbed cream cheese. I use Neufchatel, (reduced fat cream cheese) and usually add a few drops of olive or any nut oil, then I add herbs. “Vegan cream cheese” or silken tofu can be substituted for the Neufchatel cheese.

Some suggestions to mix into the filling are:
Italian seasoning , or mix any of the following{ parsley, marjoram, basil, garlic, oregano
Thyme and cracked pepper
Ground rosemary and parsley
Chives, celery salt, turmeric,paprika
Onion and pepper flakes
Cilantro and ancho powder,(be careful!)
Mesquite
Celery seed and saffron
Dill weed
Or use flavored, spreadable cream cheese from your grocer. Kraft has everything from pineapple to smoked salmon and everything in between. You can do the stuffing!

The black olives to the left in the picture have marinated chick peas (garbanzo beans) in them. Prepare as directed,{ You Know Beans, August 24, 2012 archive),or use drained, canned chickpeas. Marinate in olive oil and your choice of herbs or in Italian salad dressing for at least 3 hours .Drain and push into pitted olives.

The grape tomatoes to the left in the picture are fresh and filled with a vegetable mix that is easy and very useful. I served them on pieces of Romaine lettuce.
Frankly, I am not sure what was in that particular mix! I often fully cook whatever vegetables I have in the house,(at least 5-7 of them) along with some herbs and spices.

Use any or all of these, chopped finely:
Onion, chives, leeks and/or shallots
Celery, swiss chard, Romaine or any type of lettuce
Broccoli, cauliflower, spinach,
Bok choy, Chinese, red and/or green cabbage
Carrots, turnips, parsnips
Sweet peppers
Yellow squash and or zucchini
Green and/or wax beans, (canned or fresh)
Garlic
Opt: Parsley, ginger, celery seed, turmeric, paprika, salsify, saffron, thyme

Cook in olive oil or nut oil, stirring often. This mixture is very useful and makes a wonderful spread when mixed with cream cheese, silken tofu or to mix into or top hummus or polenta. (Recipes for both upcoming.)

I hope the picture and the recipes inspire you to try them or branch out on your own.
I will be posting more in quick succession.
Any questions?

Guest: Author Patricia Kiyono /Antipasti

I promised appetizers and antipasti, but things have been hectic here at Casa di Familia, (The Family House), so when I saw that my friend and partner on another blog, Patricia Kiyono, posted a great recipe, I knew it would make wonderful antipasto. I asked her to do a guest spot to get  me up and running again and she has graciously obliged. Technically, these would be  the salada, not antipasti, but we’re not quibbling here!

So I will turn this over to my Friend, who will discuss Food and Family.

Thank you for lending me a hand,Patricia!

 

 

Although I read blogs of all kinds, the last place I ever expected to

write a guest post would be a food blog! I love to eat, but my time in the

kitchen is very limited. You see, my hubby and I have a rather unique

distribution of labor. Because of his work hours (3 AM to noon), he came

home long before I got done with my teaching job. And although I CAN

cook, it made more sense for him to prepare the meal and get it on the table

than wait for me to do it. So I’ve always done the cleanup.

Since he’s a mixture of Scottish, Dutch, and German, his idea of a

meal is meat and potatoes – and not much else. I need my veggies – for one

thing, my Japanese mom ALWAYS had lots of veggies on the table, and for

another thing, the heavy food did awful things to my waistline. So I learned

to prepare and keep a variety of veggies on hand that I can quickly assemble

when needed. Sometimes I make a bunch ahead of time. Tonette asked me to

share a few of my favorites. My go-to vegetables are cucumber and tomato,

so I’m sharing a few ways I serve them:

First, here’s a simple and delicious way to serve cucumbers. My mom

used to make this all the time. Cookbooks and online recipes call for

Japanese or Persian cucumbers (they’re skinnier and have fewer seeds), but

since specialty food stores weren’t around back when I grew up we used

regular ones, and it tastes just fine.

Sunomono:Japanese Cucumber Salad

Sunomono:Japanese Cucumber Salad

 

Sunomono (Japanese Cucumber Salad)

2 large cucumbers, sliced as thinly as possible

1 teaspoon salt

3 Tablespoons rice vinegar

1 Tablespoon sugar (or substitute)

¼ teaspoon soy sauce

1 teaspoon sesame seeds

Sprinkle salt over cucumber slices and let sit for five minutes, then squeeze

out the water (I set them in a colander then cover with paper towel and push

down, but mom had a special veggie press like THIS ONE)

Mix rice vinegar, sugar, and soy sauce until sugar dissolves. Add to

cucumbers and top with sesame seeds. The picture here has wakame

seaweed added, which is also good – but I don’t always have wakame in the

house – it’s still good!

Doesn’t that sound easy? Another easy veggie that my kids love is

Caprese Salad, especially in the fall when our family and neighbors share

An Italian  Antipasti

An Italian Antipasti

their over-abundant gardens with us. I was first introduced to this delicious

and simple side dish when I went to Italy over 40 years ago.

Caprese Salad

1 large tomato cut in quarter-inch slices

4 to 6 oz fresh mozzarella cheese, cut in quarter-inch slices

4 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

1 Tablespoon olive oil

basil leaves

salt and pepper to taste

Arrange slices on a large plate or platter, alternating between tomato and

cheese. Drizzle with olive oil and vinegar. Season with salt and pepper to

taste. Garnish with basil.

Really, nothing to it – and it’s delicious. I call it a non-recipe recipe.

So for a bigger challenge, try combining the tomato and cucumber in a

Greek salad. In 2008 my youngest daughter did a semester abroad while she

was in college, and she chose a program on the beautiful Greek island of

Paros. I brought a friend with me to visit (gotta make sure the kid is eating

right!), and we fell in love with the cuisine. And almost every day we had

one of these delicious, simple salads.

Patricia Kiyono's Greek  Salad

Patricia Kiyono’s Greek Salad

Greek Salad

(two large servings)

1 medium tomato, cut into cubes

1 small cucumber, peeled and cut into pieces similar to tomato

¼ medium red onion

¼ cup crumbled feta cheese

3 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 Tablespoon red wine vinegar

a bit of oregano

Most recipes call for kalamata olives, but since I don’t like those I leave

them out.

Combine veggies and cheese. Combine olive oil and vinegar and pour over

the top. Garnish with oregano.
I really hadn’t planned it this way, but I see that these recipes are from

three different countries I’ve visited and loved. And I noticed that the people

in these countries don’t suffer from obesity the way we do here. I’ve

skimmed through all sorts of articles about why Italy, Greece, and Japan

have fewer problems than Americans do, and I think it boils down to a

combination of diet and lifestyle. So now that I’ve adopted some of their

foods, all I have to do is copy the rest – as soon as I find some mountains to

climb, ruins to investigate, and canals to row through!

In addition to adding to my dinner menus, my travels have sparked

my imagination, resulting in some of my published romances. After visiting

Greece, I wrote Aegean Intrigue, published by Astraea Press in February

2012. And as a tribute to my Japanese heritage, I wrote The Samurai’s

Garden, published by Astraea Press in November 2012. I’d love it if you’d

click on the titles to learn more about them!

 

You  can learn more about Patricia and her work  at these sites:

Patricia Kiyono’s Author Website

Patricia Kiyono’s Author Blog

Patricia Kiyono’s Author Facebook

You can see more through Goodreads, Amazon, Astraea Press and she is with me at

Four Foxes, One Hound

(She’s the Monday Fox; I am the Friday Fox; we have a couple of other Foxes and a Hound there, as well! Please  drop in sometime.)

Again, thank you,Patricia Kiyono!

Are You Still With Me?

Dear Friends and Family,
I know it has been some time since I last posted and I have missed all of you. I am looking forward to giving more advice to those who are insecure about cooking and entertaining and to those who need help with special diets. I also hope to continue to inspire fellow “foodies” with ideas of their own.

If you have any questions about food or diets, any questions about making entertaining easy and fun for you as well as your friends, family or even those you do not know well, please feel free to drop me a line here or at my Facebook page ,

Tonette Joyce, Food,Friends, Family on Facebook

I intend to continue offering main-stream recipes, as well as vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, low-carb and healthy alternatives. Please let me know if I can be of any special assistance to your specific needs.

When we last met I promised a series on appetizers and I assure you that they will be coming very soon, before the holidays. Everyone needs to know how to make at least the simplest of appetizers and canapés,( and to know what the difference is!) I promise that you will be able to make a nice selection, or just one or two, not to be caught like a non-foodie friend of mine who was invited to an up-scale affair at her husband’s new job. They were all to bring appetizers and she refused my help; instead, she took a plate of brownies. Her brownies were well-known among her friends and family, but that wasn’t what was expected of them. I promise you that most of what I will show you will be almost as easy as aerosol cheese squirted on a Ritz, but a whole lot more impressive in that you made unique offerings yourself.
We also may be covering new ideas, more guests and maybe a giveaway or two.

Thank you for hanging in there with me and I promise to be back very soon with a real post. Please pay me a visit!
Tonette

Twice-Baked Potatoes/From Appetizers to Entrées

Twice-Baked Potatoes/From Appetizers to Entrées

Yes, I said I’d put this recipe up before, but I had a quick request for my Codfish Cake recipe by people who missed the Gorton canned codfish cakes,(no longer available.)
Twice Baked Potatoes can be made with many ingredients, but I serve them often with seafood for Lent.

Twice-Baked Potatoes are also one of the tastiest ways to stretch your budget and leftovers. They are very convenient, and can be made well ahead of time and even frozen, ready in your oven or microwave in short order.

From appetizer to entree, an easy and delicious budget-stretcher

From appetizer to entree, an easy and delicious budget-stretcher

[The ones pictured above are made with tiny shrimp and spinach]

Twice-Baked Potatoes can be made with many ingredients, used as a side dish or as an entrée. They can even be made with mini-potatoes and used as finger-food, appetizers or placed on a buffet. They can be made with meat, seafood or vegetables and they can be made completely vegan.

You start with a nice, firm potato, any size. (For an entrée, I suggest russets.) Bake the potato to very soft in the middle. Times will vary according to the size of your potato, and, if using a microwave, the power of your unit. (Use 400F oven for baking 45-60 minutes or microwave on high for about 5-7 minutes for good-sized potatoes.)
Microwaves make perfectly acceptable Twice-Baked Potatoes, and makes them much more quickly, but when done in an oven, the potato skins become nice and crispy and the tops brown. One compromise is to first bake the potatoes in the microwave, (saving up to an hour) and then finishing them off in the oven, or even more quickly, under a low broiler.

If you are unused to baking potatoes, wash them first under running cold water and brush them with a vegetable brush or rub them using a clean cloth. If you usually wrap your potatoes in foil to bake them in the oven, omit for this recipe. Pierce the potato skin with a fork, just once. This will release enough of the pressure from the steam that may build up when the moisture in the potato get heated. If there is enough steam build-up and it cannot escape, potatoes can explode all over your oven or microwave!

When the potatoes are done, (a fork can easily slip all the way into the center of the potato), remove and, using a clean towel, oven mitt or pot holder, carefully cut through the potato length-wise. The potatoes will be very hot and the escaping steam may burn you if you are not careful. Allow to cool slightly, (but don’t let them get cold) and gently scoop out the inside of the potato, leaving the skin intact. (You may want to leave up to ¼ of an inch of the pulp all around the inside so that your potato skin does not break.) Place the pulp in a bowel, and now the creativity begins!

Here is where your taste, what is available and the season challenges you.

From appetizer to entrée any of the suggestions or your own ideas will determine your finished potatoes.

Start by mashing or even whipping the insides of the potatoes with any of the ingredients below, or a combination: [*See Note for easiest suggestions]

Butter, margarine or coconut oil

Cream cheese, sour cream or vegan sour cream, (made from tofu)

Small amount of cream or milk,{rice, soy, coconut or almond can be used

I usually use tiny shrimp, but have used crab meat and imitation crabmeat,(see ‘Seafood Pasta Salads’; Feb 2013 archive for guidelines), but I have used any pre-cooked fish.
You can also use minced bacon, ham, roast beef, or no meats at all. (For roast beef, you can add a little horseradish to the mix.)

You can add cheeses, (or vegan cheese substitutes); cheddar is the best choice here.

Use salt and pepper of any type.

You can add cooked, minced onion, green onion or onion powder, a little garlic or garlic powder;

Sautéed shallots, leeks, celery carrots, sweet peppers;

Cooked, (or frozen and well-drained), spinach is very good in these, as are canned or jarred asparagus

Parsley, paprika, celery salt, chives, sage

Dehydrated vegetable mix

A couple of drops of sesame oil and sesame seeds

Mix & match the above to taste.

* Note: I suggest you start out simply if you are unused to cooking. Add sour cream or cream cheese, salt and pepper, a little onion of some sort and vegetables, cheese, minced ham or tiny shrimp.

After you have mixed all the ingredients, spoon the filling or pipe it with a pastry bag,( or from a zipper-lock bag with the corner cut off), into the potato skin “boats”; they should be heaped in the middle, as there is more to the filling than what you scooped-out. Place the ‘boats” back in the oven, preferably under the broiler on low setting for a short time or placed back in the microwave until heated all the way through. These can then be cooled, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and frozen in a zipper-lock bag, (with as little air trapped as possible), for months. They are great to have on hand as a quick meal or for an addition when having unexpected guests. You can make the little ones ahead of time for a party or gathering.

I hope you try these.

Refried Beans/Layered Bean Dip/Tortilla Roll-ups

Here is a quick and easy, but impressive and substantial dish. This is easy to make, you can make it ahead and it is an impressive contribution when joining with others to watch a game or to take to any gathering…or to serve at home game for or movie night.
It is gluten-free and can be made fat-free and dairy-free or vegan, (if made without sour cream; vegan ‘sour cream’ can be substituted, if desired. Check the labels to be certain no traces of gluten are included in the beans, or make your own; “You Know Beans” August Archive.)

Bean dip

Here is how I made it for the Superbowl,[with Crab Cheese Ball (December Archive), Hummus-stuffed olives and Tortilla Roll ups],but you can make this in any plate or shallow bowl. (Once I made it into the shape of a Christmas tree, used sour cream as ‘garland’ and ‘hung’ olives and  jalapeño peppers on it.)

 

This can be made as mild, (the way I like it), to very hot, depending on the ‘heat’ if your salsa and the option of additional jalapeño peppers. Without knowing that your guests like it hot, better to err on the side of caution and make it mild. You can place extra jalapeños on 1/3 to ½ of the dip.

You can make your own refried beans or use canned. You can make your own Black beans,(“You Know Beans” August Archive), or you can open a can of those, too. Simple, right?

Layered Bean Dip

1 Large can of Refried Beans (Frijoles Refritos) plus 1-2 tsp. chili powder
Mix these together in a bowl and set aside.
In another bowl, add:

1 regular can of Black beans (Frijoles Negro), plus  2 tsp. lime juice
(slightly mash the Black beans with a fork , a wooden spoon or a potato masher, but keep them chunky; add the lime juice

¾ cup red salsa or picanté sauce (mild-to-medium)
½ cup green chili salsa,(mild)
½ cup sour cream or vegan substitute (if desired)
optional: chopped black olives or jalapeños

Spread the Refried bean mixture to about ¾ inch thick. Spread the Black bean mixture on top, leaving about ¾- one-inch of the Refried beans showing.
Top the Black bean mixture with the red salsa, again, leaving a ¾-one-inch border and do the same with the green salsa. (If using, now spread lines of sour cream or substitute).

Take a spatula or wide, flat spoon and insert all the way down from the middle of the dip and . without lifting it, cut a curve toward the outside. OR, take a Tablespoon and push it down into the dip and do a half-twist. Repeat this about an inch or more apart throughout the dip. This will slightly mix the layers and flavors. If desired, garnish with the olives and/or jalapeño slices. Chill; serve.

Refried Beans (My mother-in law’s recipe)

1 pound of pinto beans, cooked (see “You Know Beans” August Archive) reserve some of the liquid,
(or used canned, cooked pinto beans)
Mash with potato masher or food processor until the desired texture is reached…some like their frijoles smooth, others, quite chunky.

Then add:
1/8-1/4 cup minced onion
1 Tbsp. (or more) crushed,(or minced) fresh garlic
½ tsp. cumin
1 Tbsp. salt
1 tsp. ground black pepper
OPTIONAL:1 Tbsp. bacon grease or vegetable oil ( I have found that it is really better with a little oil, but omit for ‘fat-free’;. If using olive oil, do not use ‘extra virgin’; it is too fruity and the flavors will be in conflict.)

Place in a heavy pot and simmer for at least ½ hour, stirring occasionally to keep the beans from sticking. Add reserved liquid,(or a little water), if the beans are too thick to stir. Cool and use for the recipe above, other recipes, (upcoming), or topped with grated cheddar cheese, sour cream, jalapeños, mild cooked peppers, onions, &/or salsa.

[The Tortilla Roll-ups are known at our house as “Superbowl Food”. My sons and I saw these ridiculously easy finger foods demonstrated at our local grocery store just before one Superbowl many  moons ago.We have had them ever since and everyone loves them…and they are no effort!]

Tortilla Roll-ups

1/2 cup Neufchatel (light cream cheese) or silken tofu,

one 1/8 cup salsa or picanté sauce,(mild-medium)

Approx. 4 large flour tortillas or  6 small ones

Mix the cheese and salsa; spread fairly thinly on the tortillas.Roll the tortillas and slice about 1 1/2 inches thick. That’s it.

Any questions?