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Easter Spread/Dip; GF and Vegan Options

I generally make a cheeseball for holidays and gatherings and I have posted some recipes on these pages.  For Easter this year, I decided to go with a dip/spread, and I made it several days early so that the flavors would mellow.

You can vary it to suit the tastes and your dietary needs and of those around you. Nuts and seeds can be changed, or left out altogether. I’m making this one a little bland because I will be serving it with flavorful crackers and snacks.

Here is the recipe I made; variations in taste and vegan substitutions will be listed below:

Appetizer Spread:

7 oz of Neufchatel cheese (low-fat cream cheese)

1 Tbs cream

¼ -1/3 cup shredded mozzarella cheese,(or other moderate-to-mild white cheese)

A few drops  sesame oil (no more than 1/8 tsp; sesame oil is very strong)

1 Tbsp. + 1/2 Tsp sesame seeds, divided

3/4 tsp lemon juice

½ tsp minced garlic

1 Tbsp. basic herb/spice blend: “Mrs. Dash” (homemade recipe in previous post)

¼ cup sliced black olives

Mix  the cream cheese and cream  (or substitutes) together until smooth. Add the shredded cheese and mix. Add the sesame or other oil. Add 1 Tbsp. sesame  or other seeds, (if using); mix well.

Add the lemon juice and minced garlic, the herb blend and blend well. Add the black olives. Mix well.
Place in a small covered bowl or container, sprinkle seeds around the edges and garnish with added olive or ?  Chill thoroughly or for several days before serving.

This can be served with any type of cracker. Since I need to go gluten-free for relatives, I like Trader Joe’s Three Seed Beet Crackers .I am also  going to offer Harvest Snaps Red Lentil Tomato Basil snack crisps, available in many major markets.

ALTERNATIVES:  

Vegan “Cream Cheese” is made with cashews. I am told that it is easy to make one’s own, but it is fairly readily available in healthier-food stores  and even supermarkets. With this, you can use 2 tsp. cashew, almond or other plant-based milk instead of cream. You may add vegan ‘cheese’, or leave it out.

Finely chopped nuts can be substituted for sesame seeds, or left out completely. Walnuts, cashews, pecans  and hazelnuts, (filberts), are good choices; almonds are a bit bland to stand up  in this recipe.

Other oils, such as walnut  or almond, or even avocado, should be substituted for sesame oil if you aren’t using sesame seeds; use 1/8 tsp.

Avocado bits make a nice addition if you leave out nuts; fold in at the end.

Pimentos, green olives, or bits of mild chilies can be used in addition to, or instead of, black olives.

I hope that you try this for your friends and family.

Flourless, Gluten-free Mocha Spice Cake

A quick post as I decided to make this Thanksgiving’s Mocha-Spice cake in a flourless version.

If you haven’t tried the flourless chocolate cake I shared some time back, (or anyone else’s recipe), you may not know that it makes a lovely cake that is like a dense brownie.
By cutting back a bit on the cocoa, adding instant coffee or espresso powder and some spices, you will have a nice chocolatey cake that is more in step with Autumnal celebrations.

Flourless Mocha Spice Cake

2 oz. bittersweet or high cocoa dark chocolate +
2 oz milk chocolate

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter

3 large eggs

¾ cups sugar of choice, or 2/3 cups stevia  ‘sugar replacement’  for baking, ( made with sugar, erythritol or monkfruit)

1/3 cup cocoa powder

2 Tbsp instant coffee (or espresso powder)

1 tsp EACH nutmeg, cloves, and cinnamon, or 3 tsp. allspice. (If you know your spices, you can experiment, but you want a hint of spice, nothing overwhelming.)

Melt the chocolates and butter over a double boiler or gently in a microwave; cool slightly.
Beat the eggs slightly; add the sugar or substitute and beat until very light, thick and lemon-colored.
While still beating, stream the chocolate-butter mixture into the eggs slowly, so that the eggs do not cook from the hot mixture.

Add the cocoa, instant coffee and spices, beat well.

Pour into a 8-9 inch baking pan, prepared with baking spray or buttered/greased and dusted with cocoa powder. In either case, parchment on the bottom will help, unless you are using a spring-form pan.

Back at 350F for 25-35 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the middle comes out clean.
It will rise and seem to ‘fall’ but that is normal.

Cool. Dust with a combination of cocoa powder and sugar or stevia; grated dark or milk chocolate and white chocolate also makes a nice presentation, as do fresh berries or nuts. (And as in the picture, mocha-cocoa sea salt, which makes the edges look over-browned.)




I hope that you will try this.

Broths: Meat or Vegetable; (Vegan,Vegetarian, GF, Keto)

 

I find it hard to believe that after all this time I have never done a post of broths.

Broths are the basis of most good soups, sauces and gravies.  You can make tastier rice and other grains, (like quinoa, barley, etc.), by cooking them in broth instead of water.  Broths are extremely healthy and versatile, plus they are a wonderful way to stretch your food dollar.  Frankly,  I feel better making the most of the sacrifice of the meat that I eat.

I always trim meats and vegetables, put them away little by little, into freezer bags and when I have enough, I make broth. I may mix chicken and turkey, but I keep all others separated.

I am eating less and less pork and beef, but the way to make any meat-based broth is simple and the same:

Meat Broths

Use scraps, no matter how fatty, and (hopefully) bones with meat, (at least 2 lbs-worth); bones add extra body, flavor and  a good amount of calcium; the fat will come off later.

1 large onion (whole or cut into quarters)

2 large ribs of celery, cut into halves or quarters (preferably with leaves)

1 Tbs salt (to taste)

½ tsp pepper or 4 peppercorns

2 Tbsp. dried parsley (it makes a real difference in taste, and is a ‘superfood’ a powerhouse of nutrients)

 

(if using a slow-cooker, cook on high with less water; cook for 6-8hours). Add all to a large pot, (3 quart). Fill within 2 inches of the top with cold water. Put on a burner on high until it starts to boil, then turn down to a mild simmer; DO NOT BOIL. Allow 4-6 hours to simmer, (after 3  hours of cooking, you can taste for strength). Thoroughly cool and you can skim off all of the fat that will have risen to the surface.  Strain and discard all meat and vegetables, which will be depleted of taste and most nutrients. (The one exception to this is when I make turkey/chicken broth and use giblets; I use extra meat to make the broth strong quickly and then chop the giblets for dressing.)

Now you can use this for the basis of sauce, gravies or any other types of soups, (many recipes are found in previous posts, with more to come.) Some ideas include: adding precooked meats, (meatballs), or sausages and vegetables. The meats can be barbequed, or spiced, (Asian, Mexican, Italian). You can add vegetables alone in any combination; let your imagination and personal tastes inspire you. You can add noodles, pastas, or barley, or go gluten-free with quinoa, rice, oats, buckwheat, corn, cooked beans and legumes and/or beaten eggs.

Today I have made Egg-Drop Soup with Fresh Spinach and Parmesan. I made it with chicken broth, but often make it with vegetable broth:

1 quart chicken or vegetable broth

1/8 cup minced onion

2  1/2 cups chopped , fresh spinach or 1 cup cooked/canned spinach

1/4 cup chopped Parmesan cheese -or-
2 Tbsp grated Parmesan

4 beaten eggs

salt and white pepper to taste

Heat the broth. Add spinach, cook.  Add  eggs; stir until just cooked. Add cheese; let it melt and serve hot.

 

Vegetable Broth

Vegetable broth varies much more than my meat-broth recipes depending on the season. I cut the ends from tomatoes, spinach, carrots, green beans, the tops of celery and bok choy,  over-ripe onions, garlic, weak leaves and cores of cabbage, and lettuces, the peelings of quashes, the inner core and pith of bell peppers, you name it. (I avoid outer peelings of onions, and don’t use red ones, shallots or red cabbage as it makes the broth dark purple and unappetizing.) I put them in zip-bags in the freezer and when I have enough, I add salt, white pepper and some dried parsley and, as above, bring it to a boil in large pot of cold water and simmer for 5-6 hours. If using a slow-cooker, I add less water and cook on high for 4-5 hours If you need ideas, here are pictures of some of my gatherings, ready to be simmered into nice vegetable stock:veg stock

 

Any of the additions listed in the recipe for meat broth can be used. To go low calcium, low cholesterol, vegan, you can use plant-based meat substitutes to give your soups more protein, make the substitutes tastier and get more for the money out of them, since they are still generally quite expensive.

 

I hope that you give these recipes a try.  You will find that canned broth or those in aseptic containers pale by far in comparison.

Gluten-free Peanut Butter Cookies: Christmas/Holidays

The cookies shown are made with cookie stamps, but cookie stamps are not necessary in order to make these cookies. By simply pressing them in with a thumbprint, crisscrossed with fork tines, pressed flat with the bottom of a glass or any other creative way you can come up with to flatten them from balls  to disks will work. Look around for any textured glassware as a potential  pressed pattern, such as some of mine:

The recipe below is a variation of some which were in a leaflet that came with a cookie stamp. If you are not familiar with cookie stamps, they are generally made of ceramic with terra cotta with imprints on the bottom. The idea is to impress an image into individual cookies.

 

They are so darling, I could have collected a number of them, but I have limited myself to these, since good recipes are not easy to come by:

The biggest problem with cookie stamps is that most cookie recipes call for leavening, (generally baking powder and/or baking soda), and that causes the stamped images to become distorted.

As it is, even with the recipe below, the images are still not terribly clear, which is why I happened on the idea of ‘painting’ them.  Add powdered or paste colors to heavy cream as liquid colors make the ‘paint’ too thin.(Make the white more easily seen by adding white coloring or icing whitener.)
Use good, fine-point synthetic paintbrushes which can be sterilized, one for each color. Brush scantily along the risen images, just enough to bring the patterns out, and allow plenty of time for the cookies to dry thoroughly before putting them in any covered container or having them touch.

If you prefer to not use stamps, you may decorate with sprinkles, jimmies, peanuts or nuts.

(The most effective way to use the stamps, (or any utensil you wish to use), without  them sticking to the dough, is to lightly brush them with a bland vegetable oil or to use a vegetable oil cooking spray after pressing every 2-3 cookies.)

Flavorful Gluten-Free Peanut Butter Cookies

1  1/4  cups smooth peanut butter
(homogenized or well-stirred natural peanut butter; do not use “chunky” style)

1 cup white sugar or equivalent sugar,
-or-
3/4 cups brown or palm sugar

1 large egg

1 teaspoon vanilla or almond extract

Beat the peanut butter and sugar until creamy.  Add the egg and beat until quite light. Add the extract and mix well.
The texture may not appear to be smooth, but roll dough by hand into glossy, uniform balls,  3/4 -to-1  inches in diameter. Place on ungreased baking sheets and stamp, press with a fork or glassware to a 1/8 inch depths. (At this point, if you are using decorations or nuts, add now.) Bake at 325F for approximately 15 minutes, or until lightly browned and firm to the touch. Do not overbake. Allow to cool completely before  ‘painting’. Dry thoroughly  and place in airtight container.

 

Seven ? Layer Bars

When The Husband picked up a package of Seven-Layer Bars at the store last night,I was surprised; I had no idea that he had wanted them! They had been a big seller as a dessert choice for lunches and Sunday dinners at my bakery/restaurant. So when I made them for him and related our fairly amusing  exchange at the store on Facebook today, I was asked for the recipe.

If you have never made Seven-Layer Bars, they are an easy treat, which is popular at parties for all ages and for bake sales.

They can be made dairy-free by using Cream of Coconut instead of sweetened condensed milk, nut-free and Gluten-Free by using GF cookies and carefully reading labels and choosing your toppings.

Here’s today’s version:

 

                                                           Seven (?) Layer Bars
You may make more or fewer layers. These are VERY rich.

2 cups Cookie crumbs, plain, cinnamon or chocolate Graham cracker and/or hard cookie crumbs: Vanilla wafers, Ginger snaps, Digestives

½ cup melted butter or margarine + extra or cooking spray for pan

1 can Sweetened condensed milk = any flavor “Eagle Brand”,( not evaporated milk); 8 oz. Cream of Coconut, (not coconut milk), can be substituted

Multiple Topping choices :
Shredded coconut (1/2 cup)

Nut pieces, ½ cup (pref. walnut, but almonds, hazelnuts, cashews can be used/mixed)

Baking chips, 1+ cup total; choose, mix and match any or all:
Semi-sweet chocolate, white chocolate, milk chocolate;
butterscotch, cinnamon

Dried fruit-opt. (¼ cup)

Crushed toffee-opt. (¼ cup)

Small caramel pieces, or thick caramel in small dollops-opt. (1/3 cup)

[optional for Christmas: mint chips and/or crushed peppermint candy]

Preheat oven to 350F

Butter or spray an 8X10 or 9X9 baking pan.

Mix the melted butter or margarine and cookie crumbs.
Press firmly into the bottom of prepared pan, rising a little at edges.

Pour milk over the crust, indenting about ½ inch from the edges

Scatter coconut over the milk. Add layer by layer the nuts, chips and/or candy pieces, avoiding the edges.

Bake for approx. 40 minutes, until the chips are melted and the edges slightly browned.

Let cool in pan on rack COMPLETELY to set. When cool, cut into bars.

Gluten-Free Pie Alternatives+Vegan/Tree Nut-free Options

As promised, I am back with gluten-free options for pie lovers.

I adapted the “No-Fail” Piecrust recipe which I posted five years ago for the pumpkin pie: https://tonettejoycefoodfriendsfamily.wordpress.com/2013/11/16/you-can-make-pie-crust-and-pastryveganchiffon/
which can, of course, be used for any baked pie.

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Unfortunately, the camera did not do a good job and no, the right side of the pie‘s crust was not white; it was from a reflection of the flash.

I used homemade oat flour and almond meal. Homemade grain/seed/nut meals are easier to make than you think. You can find them in stores, and generally, they cost an arm and a leg. Oatmeal is inexpensive and if you grind your own almonds/nuts/seeds, (plus buy on sale or in bulk,) it’s much less expensive than bagged flours and meals. All nuts and seeds, in any form, can be frozen, (in as little air as possible).
The finished, unbaked pie crust can be frozen, as well.

To grind your own flours and meals takes little effort. You can do it in bigger batches in a strong food processor, but many leave bigger pieces in the bottom corners or on the top. You either end up with underground pieces or have the rest of your meal ground to powder/paste while trying to get the others ground down. I have three grinders from which to choose, but you only need one:WP_20181202_001.jpg

You may recognize the Mr. Coffee grinder; which is just about perfect. The Salton grinder is at least 40 years old; it was my aunt’s. The mini-processor is really convenient for grinding small batches and for whipping cream.( Mix any berry type into the cream or to coconut cream and you have a luscious, quick dessert, with or without other fruit or cake!)

I used old-fashioned oats and just turned on the grinder, dumping batch-by-batch into a bowl to measure out later.

The almond meal came out wetter, as would that of many nuts and seeds, but this isn’t a problem, since it helps with the cohesion of the crust. You can adjust up the amount of wetness by adding a little more water slowly, if needed.

For this Gluten-Free Pie Crust w/ Vegan /Tree nut-free Alternatives I used:
2 ¼ cups oat flour
1 ½ cup almond meal (or alternative nut/seed meal)
1 ¼ cup vegetable shortening (see note in the link above in reference to vegetable shortenings)
3 tsp sugar (any type), or less, if using a granulated stevia mix
1 ½ Tbsp. Apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. water
[OPT: 1/4 tsp vanilla or almond extract]
1 egg* or
1-2 Tbsp. flegg**
Mix the flours and sweetener. Cut in the shortening , (as directed in the ‘No-Fail’ recipe). Mix the water, (opt. flavor), egg/ flegg and vinegar together; mix into the meals.

This will not roll-out as the ‘No-Fail’ recipe. Gluten is what makes the crust pliable. You will need to press this into whatever pie plate you choose, as you would with a graham cracker crust. Press in gently but firmly; make sure that you have enough on the bottom and up the sides to hold the filling, but press out any excess that tends to build-up at the bottom edges. Since this will not cut-up or crimp, you will have to get creative with any attempts at decorations, as I did with sprinkles.

[Unlike graham cracker crust made with, well, graham cracker crumbs and butter or margarine, this cannot be used for refrigerator pies; it must be baked.]

*NOTE: To make a half-batch, use 1/2 egg. Crack a large egg and mix it. Use half in this recipe; cook the rest in other in any way, as in: add to an omelet, scrambled eggs, add to a cake recipe, (It will give more ‘lift’). It will keep covered in the refrigerator for several days.
**NOTE: “Flegg” is an egg substitute made (usually) with flaxseed or Chia seeds. You can make your own by adding around 2 Tbsp. of seed ,(grind the flaxseed for better results), to a quarter cup of very hot, (not boiling), water.*

After a short time, you should have a sticky, gelatinous mixture that will add to the cohesion of your crust in the same way an egg would. The stickiness is ‘mucilage’ and if you are a certain age, you know that we used a type of this for glue, so you can imagine the help it gives to binding the crust. You can use flegg for many alternatives, but not when you need a ‘rise’, as in a cake. (Flegg also adds nutritional value, fiber and omega-3s)

[*NOTE: Please heat water on the stove or in the microwave. Water out of a water heater should never be ingested. Heavy metals from the heater can leach into the water and any impurities and/or contaminants that may have slipped passed your water authority, (or is considered within their acceptable parameters for tap water), will be condensed in the continual ‘cooking’ of the water.]

Here is a healthier, G-F /Tree nut-free+Vegan alternative to pie:

Fruit Crisp:
3 cups (approx) sliced fruit or berries
1 cup whole, raw oatmeal*
2/3 Chopped walnuts, other nuts, or non-tree nuts/seeds
4 Tbsp. sugar (beet, cane, turbinado, date, coconut, stevia mix), DIVIDED
(OPT: a little spice that you like, for instance: cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice)
6-8 Tbsp. Butter or margarine, DIVIDED

Use 1 Tbsp.+ butter or margarine to butter the bottom and sides of a deep baking or casserole dish.
Slice apples, peaches, pears, etc., or add berries to nearly fill the dish. If desired, sprinkle with 1 Tbsp. granulated sugar/alternative. Dot with 2 Tbsp. of the butter or margarine.
Melt the remaining butter or margarine. Add the sugar (and spice, if using). Mix in the oatmeal, and walnuts/alternative. Sprinkle evenly over the fruit and bake at 350F for about 40 minutes, until the top is slightly browned.
Serve warm or cold, plain or with whipped cream, (or whipped canned, chilled coconut milk), or ice cream   or frozen alternatives.
*NOTE: I used old-fashioned oats in the crisp below, but they came out a little stiff. I will use quick-cook oatmeal to top it the next time. If you wish to layer the fruit and toppings, or will be using ice cream or frozen alternatives afterward, use old-fashioned oats, so that they will not become too soft.

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I do hope that you try and enjoy the recipes above. Please let me know if you tried any other nut alternatives and how they worked for you.

Some Basic Tips

Hello, Friends and Family! After many happenings and much time, I am here, but at first by request for baking tips.

It’s a good place to start, and just after Thanksgiving in the U.S., and before Christmas

Let’s start with a few basics.

Sift flours and powdered sugar. You don’t need a sifter; you can use a fine-mesh sieve: WP_20181113_004
MEASURE: If you are not used to cooking, measure your ingredients, but cooking and baking isn’t rocket science. Feel free to play around. In fact, do so more or less with seasonings, herbs, spices, nuts, etc., but don’t guess with flours and leavening. It’s better to add slightly less leavening and flour than even slightly too much.

Contrary to some recipe directions, do not add your leavenings [baking powder, baking soda, salt,] and seasonings to the flour before sifting; too much gets lost in that which is not used.

Always mix your butter/margarine/shortening, then add sugar or sweetener, and mix well in between. If eggs are in the recipe, add them afterward and mix well, add flavorings and scrape the bowl often. DO NOT dump everything into a bowl and expect a nicely textured cake or cookies.

Alternate adding the sifted flour with any added liquid, and mix well in between each addition.

Rest your batter before adding extra flour and before putting into pans or trying to make drop cookies; the batter will set and become stiffer after it sits. You don’t want it to become too stiff.

Chill pie crusts that call for it and rolled cookie dough well; overnight is the best. Wrapped well, they will last for days in your refrigerator or months in your freezer.

Roll out your doughs on flour, parchment paper or waxed paper . Roll small amounts of cookie dough at a time if using flour and add more ‘fresh’ dough to the scraps each time to keep your cookies from becoming hard when baked.

Dip your cookie cutters in flour between cuts.

Spray cookie stamps with cooking spray or dip them in vegetable oil and blot to keep them from sticking to the dough.WP_20181123_002

Preheat your oven, and put baked goods onto the upper-middle rack. If your baked goods tend to brown on the top too soon, then use a lower rack. If they tend to brown too soon on the bottom, preheat your oven on BROIL. Make sure that the broiler is turned off and the oven on and set to the correct baking temperature, (generally 350F), before you add your cookies and cakes.

Test for doneness by gently touching the top of cookies; they should be gently firm. Lift a cookie to check the bottom for doneness; they should be only lightly browned.
Also touch the cake tops; your finger should leave no imprint. Use a toothpick or thin knife to test the middle of cakes; they should come out clean with no batter stuck to them

Prepare pans: Baking pans for cakes and quick breads can be prepared by greasing and flouring, but that tends to make them crumby on the outside. Aerosol baking sprays work well; liquid, brush-on varieties are best, but expensive. Regular greasing/buttering/sprays can be made more efficient by using strips of baking parchment paper.
Cookie sheets can be used multiple times in a row by using parchment paper alone, (clean the pans well before putting them away). Cool the metal sheets between batches by temporarily removing the parchment paper and running the pans under cool water, (use pot holders).

INGREDIENTS:
DAIRY: Whole milk is best for baking, but 2% is useable. Skim milk simply does not work as well. Almond and other nut milks, Soy and Rice milks are useable.

You can make your own condensed version by simmering the milks until it is reduced, but canned coconut milk is the easiest to use.

Milk substitutions:

Most recipes calling for buttermilk come out just wonderfully by using any of the milks above with 2 teaspoonsful of white or apple cider vinegar or my preference, lemon juice. I use real lemons whenever possible, but keep a bottle of reconstituted lemon juice in my refrigerator for this purpose alone. (I will not substitute the real buttermilk called for in my husband’s grandmother’s Carrot Cake recipe, however!)

You can make a sour cream substitution by making it even better: Crème Fraiche. Use heavy cream, add lemon juice and let it sit at room temperature for 24-48 hours, (in not too hot of a room). Refrigerate. It’s wonderful. A quicker version is a mix of cream cheese, (vegan or cow) and milk, (cow or nut/soy/rice milks).

Vegan milks will not thicken as well, as cow milk, (but can be used), especially with a little thickenings, such as milk mixed with a little corn starch. There are Vegan Sour creams and cream cheese on the market, but most are soy-based.

Goat milk is strong; I do not recommend using it for baking.

Whipping cream of coconut with a little coconut or other vegan milk is a good substitute for condensed milk. Well-chilled, full-fat coconut canned milk can be whipped like cream.

WHIP-IT and other brands of whipped-cream stabilizer made of dextrose and modified corn starch is quite helpful in both coconut and cow whipped cream.

SALT is also a leavening; leaving it out of baked-good recipes is a mistake. Baking soda is used alone with acidic batters, like those with butter milk/sour milk. Baking Powder is a mix of baking soda and cream of tartar; they are not interchangeable. Cream of tartar was often found on pantry shelves when more home-cooking was done. Its most common use is in volumizing whipped egg whites.

Palm and other sugars can be substituted for white sugar. Brown sugar sold in America is usually sugar which has had the molasses removed by refining, and has had molasses returned in varying degree, (light or dark). I know; it makes no sense. But what this means is that in a recipe, you can substitute white sugar with a little molasses beaten into the mix, but mix extra well, as the texture of the sugar is not as fine.

White and dark corn syrup can be used interchangeably. If you really want dark with a richer flavor, you can add a little molasses.

There are dark syrups available, (Sorghum was big in Kentucky for generations), but I am skeptical about Brown rice syrup and Blue Agave. Both can, contrary to earlier reports, raise blood glucose levels and agave may cause miscarriages.

Flours:
All-purpose flour will be familiar to those of you who need to read this blog. Choose unbleached for nearly all of your basic needs. “White wheat” is a healthier alternative, but your baked goods will not rise as high and will not be as delicate.

Bread flour has higher protein and more gluten and makes for a chew consistency. Do not use for cakes and pastry.

Whole wheat flour takes extra effort and is harder to work with.

Alternative flours: I am experimenting now that I have family members who are gluten-sensitive. You cannot simply substitute other flours for the all-purpose flour most recipes call for and expect great results. It takes time and tweaking. Indeed, making bread and many doughs will not work at all with some flours because it is gluten that makes dough elastic. Plus, many flours, like besan, (chickpea flour), may be healthier, but they have an off-taste. You can disguise some of these with strong enough flavors. (I make a dense chocolate cake which basically covers the bean-taste.)

just developed a pie crust made of oat and almond flour. It is tasty, but it is not flaky, and it cannot be rolled-out, but needs to be pressed into the pie plate before filling. I’ll post that in the next post, soon.

I want to post this as soon as possible, although I have not touched on many points.

Please feel free if you have any ideas, questions or have any points you’d like to see addressed.

Thank you for being with me!

Chicken[Tofurkey,Quorn] Paprika(GF, DF)

Yes, it’s me. I have not forgotten you. I had my promised series on antipasti ready and my computer crashed taking all of the recipes with it…and that was just the beginning!
I have pix of most of what I created and will try to sort out what was what, but in the meantime, here is a recipe I have been asked for by a few people.

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The best way to make this is with boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Done right, they will not be dry. You can use boneless, skinless thighs, if you really prefer dark meat. There is no reason why one could not use thick slices of Tofurkey, (any brand of like product), or Quorn roasts to make a vegan or vegetarian version. I will add directions for alternatives below. I also, as usual, have short-cuts to make the recipe simpler.
The recipe will serve two big eaters. Simply multiply the ingredients to serve more.

Chicken Paprika
2+1 Tbsp Butter or margarine
1 large onion, chopped
2 large cloves garlic, chopped,(or 1 Tbsp dried, minced garlic)
1 ½ Tbsp paprika,(regular or half can be smoked)
1 ½ lbs of boneless chicken breasts or thighs
Salt
1 ½ cups strong chicken broth…(if you are using canned or from a carton, cook over high heat to reduce and strengthen. If you want to use bullion, make it double-strength)
1 cup crème fraiche, or sour cream
1 Tbsp plain flour , 1 ½ tsp corn starch or rice flour

Melt the 2 Tbsp butter or margarine. Quickly brown the chicken on both sides, (it will raw in the middle). Remove from the pan. Lower the heat, add the extra butter, onion, garlic , paprika and salt to the pan and cook just until the onion is wilted. Add the broth and the chicken, and cook on low heat just until the chicken is cooked in the middle. Again, remove the chicken and keep it warm. Mix the flour into the crème fraiche or sour cream and mix until smooth. Add slowly to the broth, (a whisk is helpful here). Raise the temperature and stir until the mixture is thickened. Lower the heat to warm. Add the chicken, turning once, until the chicken is rewarmed throughout and has absorbed some of the sauce. Serve over rice, couscous, boiled or mashed potatoes. Be generous with the sauce.

Tofurkey or Quorn Paprika
2+1 Tbsp margarine
1 large onion, chopped
2 large cloves garlic, chopped,(or 1 Tbsp dried, minced garlic)
1 ½ Tbsp paprika,(regular or half can be smoked)
1 ½ lbs of thickly sliced Tofurkey or Quorn roast
Salt
1 ½ cups strong vegetable broth…(if you are using canned or from a carton, cook over high heat to reduce and strengthen. If you want to use bullion, make it double-strength)
1 cup vegan sour cream or silken tofu
1 Tbsp plain flour , 1 ½ tsp corn starch or rice flour

Melt the 2 Tbsp margarine. Quickly brown the meat substitute on both sides. Remove from the pan. Lower the heat, add the extra margarine, the onion, garlic, paprika and salt to the pan and cook just until the onion is wilted. Add the vegetable broth and heat to boiling. Mix the vegan sour cream or silken tofu with the flour until smooth and add slowly to the broth, (a whisk is helpful here). Raise the temperature and stir until the mixture is thickened. Lower the heat to warm. Add the Tofurkey or Quorn turning once, until it is rewarmed throughout and has absorbed some of the sauce. Serve over rice, couscous, boiled or mashed potatoes. Be generous with the sauce.

Audio Book Giveaway Winner

 

The winner is a regular supporter of mine, (her name was literally drawn out of a hat by my grandson), Charlie Louie of the beautiful cooking/travel blog “Hotly Spiced.”

Thanks to all of you who entered here and on my shared writers’ blog, “Four Foxes, One Hound”, here at WordPress.

I hope many of you check out “Dump Dinners Recipes” by Daniel Cook, read by Diane Davis, and continue to join me here for more food, friends, family.

Appetizers VIII; Custards,HUmmus, Couscous/Vegan

After too long of a break, we continue our series on appetizers. I have saved some of the most impressive ones for these last two post for the time being. I will give you a few unusual flavor combinations to try, or to spark your imagination for other combinations.

Although the next and,(for this series, the last), posts will feature possibly the easiest, the ones here today may take a little more time, but can be made ahead of time. In fact, it’s necessary.

We have already discussed making or buying hummus [December 13, 2014 Archive ] and polenta [January 4, 2015 Archive ], which are contained in the appetizers pictured. I have not discussed couscous, which is made of granules of semolina, (wheat), and can either be steamed or boiled to a softened-but-still-firm consistency. I often buy it made with vegetables, much like garden pasta, which makes a tasty and colorful alternative side dish to potatoes, rice and pasta. More couscous recipes will be in upcoming posts.

Some of the appetizers you see here today contain custard. Simple custard is made by a ratio of 1 large egg to 1 cup of milk (of any type, cow, almond, etc.), and baked in a slow/moderate oven, (325F), in glass or ceramic baking vessels. These need to be surrounded by water halfway up their sides , placed in a larger vessel of any oven-proof material.

Since simple custard is very “eggy”, other ingredients must be added. For a sweet custard, sugar, stevia, honey or other sweetener must be added, and can be made with many other flavorings. Most often, vanilla extract is added, but lemon or orange zest, coconut, nutmeg or almost any flavor that will not dilute the egg-milk ratio will work. Too much more liquid, and your custard will not “set”, which is to become firm. On the other hand, adding pre-cooked rice, (which is also good in the sweetened versions), will have little effect on the texture. Ground nuts, seed or coconut are also acceptable additives.

However, for savory recipes, you want your custard to noy

After too long of a break, we continue our series on appetizers. I have saved some of the most impressive ones for these last two post for the time being. I will give you a few unusual flavor combinations to try, or to spark your imagination for other combinations.

Although the next and,(for this series, the last), posts will feature possibly the easiest, the ones here today may take a little more time, but can be made ahead of time. In fact, it’s necessary.

We have already discussed making or buying hummus [ ] and polenta [ ], which are contained in the appetizers pictured. I have not discussed couscous, which is made of granules of semolina, (wheat), and can either be steamed or boiled to a softened-but-still-firm consistency. I often buy it made with vegetables, much like garden pasta, which makes a tasty and colorful alternative side dish to potatoes, rice and pasta. More couscous recipes will be in upcoming posts.

Some of the appetizers you see here today contain custard. Simple custard is made by a ratio of 1 large egg to 1 cup of milk (of any type, cow, almond, etc.), and baked in a slow/moderate oven, (325F), in glass or ceramic baking vessels. These need to be surrounded by water halfway up their sides , placed in a larger vessel of any oven-proof material.

Since simple custard is very “eggy”, other ingredients must be added. For a sweet custard, sugar, stevia, honey or other sweetener must be added, and can be made with many other flavorings. Most often, vanilla extract is added, but lemon or orange zest, coconut, nutmeg or almost any flavor that will not dilute the egg-milk ratio will work. Too much more liquid, and your custard will not “set”, which is to become firm. On the other hand, adding pre-cooked rice, (which is also good in the sweetened versions), will have little effect on the texture. Ground nuts, seed or coconut are also acceptable additives.

However, for savory recipes, you want your custard to not be sweet, so you will add salt and then, again, any herbs or dry, (or dry-ish), vegetables that strike your fancy. Sautéed onions or shallots are a good choice, or dehydrated peppers or tomatoes. Maybe you’d prefer herbs: parsley, sage, rosemary or thyme, (I don’t recommend them together!), or lemon zest. You can also add a little cheese before baking, but cut back just a bit on the milk.

Test for doneness as you would a cake. Insert a knife into the middle of the custard. When the knife blade comes out clean, your custard is done. The time depends on the size of your containers. One-cup capacity can be done in as little as 40 minutes; a large container can take up to an hour and a half. But never go by time alone.

I have not yet experimented with these myself, but I am assured that quite good vegan versions of custard can be made in several ways, at any level of cooking expertise.

Easy: Silken tofu or heavy, canned coconut milk * blended with a small amount of coconut oil, then chilled

Moderate: Almond or coconut milk blended with tapioca powder or arrowroot ,( plus flavorings), baked as above.

Nuts, (especially cashews), puréed with a little coconut oil or heavy, canned coconut milk*

Advanced: Pastry cream made of coconut or nut milks. This is cooked by whisking over a double boiler with water, salt, flour and cornstarch.

[* NOTE: Coconut milk in cartons is too thin for the quick custards which have this notation. Several types and brands of canned coconut milk are available. Although I generally choose the types that ‘slosh’ when I shake the cans, you want the ones that seem solid when you shake them. Do not use “Cream of Coconut”, as this is far too sweet.]

For the appetizers here, I used cooled custard, and put them together easily with purchased, premade filo cups and rye flatbread.

Filo custard cups, which are vegan, sometime come in grocery freezer cases, but if you will be using them quickly, refrigeration is not necessary as they are prebaked and ready-to-fill. Flatbread, which is also vegan, comes in packages in the cracker aisle. It comes in several flavors made from several types of grain. It also come in long pieces which I just snapped off with irregular edges. Since there is no way to cut them evenly, let’s say that it lends a certain handmade charm to the appetizers.(That’s my story and I’m sticking to it!) You can use any type of non-sweet cracker, gluten-free cracker or even corn chips.

Appetizers featuring Hummus, Couscous and Custard make an imaginative and impressive array

Appetizers featuring Hummus, Couscous and Custard make an imaginative and impressive array

Pictured are :

Pepper-Jack cheese melted over polenta in filo cup, feel free to use vegan ‘cheese’

Pepper-Jack cheese melted over couscous in filo cup, topped with a slice of black olive

Herbed rice custard in filo cup topped with an herbed tomato slice

Hot Pepper custard in filo cups with salmon cream cheese, topped with apple and bacon; vegan “bacon” can easily be substituted.

Hummus in filo cup topped with sautéed mixed vegetables

Hummus with toasted coconut in filo cup topped with toasted sesame seeds

Hummus with pistachio on flatbread

Hummus with coconut on flatbread

Herbed custard rice with herbed tomato on flatbread

Salmon cream cheese with cashew and apple on rye flatbread
(More on using cream cheeses in the next post.)

Of course, you should know by now that none of these combinations are absolutes. Try mixing and matching textures and flavors, herbs, vegetables, fruits, nuts, grains and anything that strikes your fancy. If you like it, try serving it!

Any comments?

be sweet, so you will add salt and then, again, any herbs or dry, (or dry-ish), vegetables that strike your fancy. Sautéed onions or shallots are a good choice, or dehydrated peppers or tomatoes. Maybe you’d prefer herbs: parsley, sage, rosemary OR thyme, (I don’t recommend them together!), or lemon zest. You can also add a little cheese before baking, but cut back just a bit on the milk.
Test for doneness as you would a cake. Insert a knife into the middle of the custard. When the knife blade comes out clean, your custard is done. The time depends on the size of your containers. One-cup capacity can be done in as little as 40 minutes; a large container can take up to an hour and a half. But never go by time alone.
I have not yet experimented with these myself, but I am assured that quite good vegan versions of custard can be made in several ways.
Easy: Silken tofu or heavy, canned coconut milk * blended with a small amount of coconut oil, then chilled
Moderate: Almond or coconut milk blended with tapioca powder or arrowroot ,( plus flavorings), baked as above.
Nuts, (especially cashews), puréed with a little coconut oil or heavy, canned coconut milk*
Advanced: Pastry cream made of coconut or nut milks. This is cooked by whisking over a double boiler with water, salt, flour and cornstarch.
[* Coconut milk in cartons is too thin for the quick custards which have this notation. Several types and brands of canned coconut milk are available. Although I generally choose the types that ‘slosh’ when I shake the cans, you want the ones that seem solid when you shake them. Do not use “Cream of Coconut”, as this is far too sweet.]
For the appetizers here, I used cooled custard, and put them together easily with purchased, premade filo cups and rye flatbread.
Filo custard cups, which are vegan, sometime come in grocery freezer cases, but if you will be using them quickly, refrigeration is not necessary as they are prebaked and ready-to-fill. Flatbread, which is also vegan, comes in packages in the cracker aisle. It comes in several flavors made from several types of grain. It also come in long pieces which I just snapped off with irregular edges. Since there is no way to cut them evenly, let’s say that it lends a certain handmade charm to the appetizers.(That’s my story and I’m sticking to it!) You can use any type of non-sweet cracker, gluten-free cracker or even corn chips.
Pictured are :
Pepper-Jack cheese melted over polenta in filo cup, feel free to use vegan ‘cheese’
Pepper-Jack cheese melted over couscous in filo cup, topped with a slice of black olive.
Herbed rice custard in filo cup topped with an herbed tomato slice
Hot Pepper custard in filo cups with salmon cream cheese, topped with apple and bacon; vegan “bacon” can easily be substituted.
Hummus in filo cup topped with sautéed mixed vegetables
Hummus with toasted coconut in filo cup topped with toasted sesame seeds
Hummus with pistachio on flatbread
Hummus with coconut on flatbread
Herbed custard rice with herbed tomato on flatbread
Salmon cream cheese with cashew and apple on rye flatbread
(More on using cream cheeses in the next post.)
Of course, you should know by now that none of these combinations are absolutes. Try mixing and matching textures and flavors, herbs, vegetables, fruits, nuts, grains and anything that strikes your fancy. If you like it, try serving it!
Any comments?