Mini Meatball Soup and Stew/Broth

In continuing with the last post’s theme, here are two recipes using tiny ground beef meatballs that are homemade, easy, comforting. The Stew was a specialty of my favorite uncle-by-marriage, a brave Welshman who joined the crazy Italian side. It has always been a hit with family and friends. And it needn’t be a fiesta day to enjoy the Fiesta Day Soup; it was a staple for luncheon in my bakery/restaurant.

To make basic meatballs, take one pound of ground beef, sprinkle with salt and roll into balls approximately one to one and a half inch in diameter. (do not make them large but don’t worry too much about how big they are as long as they are of generally consistent size.) Pan-fry in 2 Tbsp. butter, margarine, regular olive oil or peanut oil, turning often to brown on all sides…or if you wish to make a larger number or have other irons in the fire, bake them on buttered, oiled or cooking spray covered foil-lined baking pan @350F until just cooked through. Drain of oil and fat, and place in a container or freezer bag. Cover with beef broth, (homemade broth recipes below), or bouillon reconstituted from cubes or granules. Freeze flat or in a square container if using bags, so that they might store more easily when solid.

Thaw slowly in a pot when ready to use and you can have homemade one-bowl meals in short time with the recipes below, just in time for cooler weather, when you are pressed for time or for unexpected company. These are great for after winter activities to warm you from the inside–out.

Baby Meatball Stew*

 

One pound prepared small meatballs with broth (or bouillon)

One cup of sliced carrots

One cup of green beans

One cup of diced potatoes

Salt and Pepper

Dash of thyme {optional

1 Tbsp. corn starch

Place all ingredients in a heavy pot; simmer until the vegetables are cooked. Mix corn starch with two Tbsp. water and add to simmering stew; stir to thicken. Serve with buttered bread, preferably whole-grain or crusty French or Italian breads.

EASIER  Baby Meatball stew:

 

Prepared meatballs with broth

1 can sliced potatoes {drained

1 can green beans {drained

1 can sliced carrots (undrained

1 Tbsp. corn starch

Mix or match fresh vegetables with canned, (if using any fresh, cook in broth with meatballs until tender before adding canned). Simmer all until thoroughly warmed and the flavors mix. Dissolve cornstarch in two tablespoons of water and blend into stew while it is simmering to thicken. Serve with breads, as above.

Fiesta Day Soup

1 Tablespoon of butter

One medium onion, diced

2/3 cup carrots, sliced

½ cup bell pepper, diced

1 cup tomatoes, diced, (can be canned)

1 cup tomato sauce

1 lb. prepared mini meatballs

Enough water to make 2 cups of liquid with the broth

2 cloves of garlic, crushed (or 2 tsp. dried garlic chips

1 ½   tsp. dried Basil

1 Bay leaf

½ tsp. paprika

Salt and pepper

1/3 cup tiny pasta (pastina, stars, achini di pepe, etc.

or ½ cup cooked rice

Melt butter and sauté  the fresh vegetables until soft. Add the meatballs, broth and water (if needed); add herbs, spices, tomatoes and  tomato sauce. Simmer for 30-45 minutes. Add the pasta, stir and cook until the pasta is done. Remove the Bay leaf and serve.

(If using cooked rice, add after the soup has cooked for 30-45 minutes; add rice and simmer for 10-15 minutes .Remove Bay leaf and serve.

[Note: The pasta or rice will continue to absorb the liquid in any left-over soup. It will become thick, but the flavor will not suffer. If it becomes too thick, add a little water when  re-heating]

 

Broths are simple and easy and you should make them.I will focus on beef broth in this post.

I save any bones and trimmings from beef that I buy  and freeze them until I have enough for broth…or I will buy  beef ribs ; they are THE best, robust  flavor for broth.Either way, take whatever beef you’d like to use and place it n a large pot..Cover with at least 4 quarts of water.Add on chopped medium onion, 2-3 ribs of celery, 1/8 cup dried parsley, 1 Tbsp. salt and either 1 tsp. ground black pepper,(preferably course ground), or 5  whole  peppercorns. Do not chop the vegetables; they will be easier to remove when the  broth is cooked.(They will have spent their flavors and be useless afterward.)  Although many people do,I do not add carrots.I believe that it imparts too strong of a flavor into the broth.

Simmer until the liquid is reduced to one-third of it’s original volume.Taste for  salt and add more if necessary, re-taste to check for strength and cook longer if it is weak . Strain the cooked broth into a large bowl.If there are any good, lean pieces of meat you can remove them and add them to the strained broth; discard vegetables, bones, fat, cartilage. Chill.This is an important step; it will bring all the fat to the top and it will solidify, making it easy to remove and leaving you with practically fat-free, protein-filled, calcium  and vitamin-enriched broth. If there is meat, you can add vegetables, and noodles, pasta, rice or barley to a hearty  make soup.If plain,  you can freeze it in small batches and use it for gravies or as a base for other soups. Enjoy!

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6 thoughts on “Mini Meatball Soup and Stew/Broth

  1. tonettejoyce Post author

    Thanks, Judy. A now-defunct Mexican restaurant that I frequented made a soup much like the Fiesta one; when I saw a recipe that I thought was close,I tweaked it.
    Drop in again soon;I will be telling the story of my mostly-Irish father’s first Thanksgiving with the Italian side!

    Reply
  2. manningtreearchive

    I tried the above recipes except Easier Baby Meatball stew. Delicious. My wife is German/British who love to cook, but I enjoy cooking very often, something I learned years ago while living abroad alone. I will wait for more of your posts. Have you tried spicy food?

    Reply
  3. tonettejoyce Post author

    Yes, I do spicy at times. I was trying to start out in a more general vein, as this is an ‘easy entertaining’ blog, to teach people that it is easy to home-cook and have company in their homes.Many people, (and I don’t think it is just Americans),are very rushed and are living away from family so that they are losing connection to them and to home cooking…and feel that they can’t entertain.
    .As a matter of fact,I have a very large selections of herbs and spices in many shelves in my kitchen.I am in a small , non-diverse town now and travel 45 miles to an Indian market to buy many of them in bulk. My husband goes into a ‘Marco Polo’ mode and will say, (‘dramatically’):
    “We travel far in search of spices!” With the prices of spices, many people don’t have a lot on hand, especially if they are unaccustomed to cooking from scratch.
    If you have any ideas you’d like to share on the ease of preparing nice foods, on entertaining , please let me know;I’d enjoy having you ‘guest blog’. I know with a German/British wife, the two of you must have some interesting blended-family stories…and this is what it is all about…food, friends and family!
    Thank you for your interest!
    email me: tomettemjs@gmail.com

    Reply

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